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PARALYSIS

Paralysis is a loss of muscle function for one or more muscles. Paralysis can be accompanied by a loss of feeling (sensory loss) in the affected area if there is sensory damage as well as motor.
A paralysis accompanied by involuntary tremors is usually called “palsy”
When any part of the relay system — such as the brain, spinal cord, nerves, or junction between the nerve and the muscle — is damaged, the signals to move do not make it through to the muscles and paralysis results. … The most common causes of paralysis include: Stroke. Spinal cord injury.
Paralysis is a loss of strength in and control over a muscle or group of muscles in a part of the body. Most of the time, this is not due to a problem with the muscles themselves. It is more likely due to a problem somewhere along the chain of nerve cells that runs from the body part to your brain and back again. These nerve cells deliver the signals for your muscles to move.
There are many types and degrees of paralysis. The condition can be:

  • Partial, when you still have some control of your muscles (sometimes called paresis).
  • Complete, when you can’t move your muscles at all
  • Permanent, when muscle control never comes back.
  • Temporary, when some or all muscle control returns.
  • Flaccid, when the muscles get flabby and shrink.
  • Spastic, when the muscles are tight and hard and jerk around oddly (spasm).

The most common causes of paralysis include:

  • Stroke
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Head injury
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Guillain-Barré syndrome
  • Peripheral neuropathy

What other problems can occur with paralysis?
Because paralysis can happen to any muscle or group of muscles, many body functions can be affected. Some of the problems that can occur along with paralysis include:

  • Problems with blood flow, breathing, and heart rate
  • Changes in the normal function of organs, glands, and other tissues
  • Changes to muscles, joints, and bones
  • Skin injuries and pressure sores
  • Blood clots in the legs
  • Loss of urine and bowel control
  • Sexual problems
  • Problems speaking or swallowing
  • Behavior and mood changes