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SHOULDER

  • Frozen Shoulder:

Frozen shoulder, also known as adhesive capsulitis, is a condition characterized by stiffness and pain in your shoulder joint. Signs and symptoms typically begin gradually, worsen over time and then resolve, usually within one to three years.
Your risk of developing frozen shoulder increases if you’re recovering from a medical condition or procedure that prevents you from moving your arm — such as a stroke or a mastectomy.
Treatment for frozen shoulder involves range-of-motion exercises and, sometimes, corticosteroids and numbing medications injected into the joint capsule. In a small percentage of cases, arthroscopic surgery may be indicated to loosen the joint capsule so that it can move more freely.
It’s unusual for frozen shoulder to recur in the same shoulder, but some people can develop it in the opposite shoulder.

  • Impingement Syndrome:

Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common cause of shoulder pain. It occurs when there is impingement of tendons or bursa in the shoulder from bones of the shoulder. Overhead activity of the shoulder, especially repeated activity, is a risk factor for shoulder impingement syndrome. Examples include: painting, lifting, swimming, tennis, and other overhead sports. Other risk factors include bone and joint abnormalities.
With impingement syndrome, pain is persistent and affects everyday activities. Motions such as reaching up behind the back or reaching up overhead to put on a coat or blouse, for example, may cause pain.
Over time, impingement syndrome can lead to inflammation of the rotator cuff tendons (tendinitis) and bursa (bursitis). If not treated appropriately, the rotator cuff tendons can start to thin and tear.

  • Rotator Cuff Tear:

Rotator cuff tears are the leading cause of shoulder pain and shoulder-related disability.
Rotator cuff tears can be caused by degenerative changes, repetitive micro traumas, severe traumatic injuries, atraumatic injuries and secondary dysfunctions.
Traumatic injury to the rotator cuff can be caused by falling on an outstretched hand, by an unexpected force when pushing or pulling, or during shoulder dislocation.
Individuals with a rotator cuff tear may suffer from:

  • severe pain at time of injury
  • pain at night
  • pain with overhead activities
  • positive painful arc sign
  • weakness of involved muscle
  • shoulder stiffness.
  • Fracture:

Trauma may cause a fracture of the humerus (ball) or the glenoid (socket) of the shoulder joint.
Symptoms:

  • Shoulder Pain
  • Swelling
  • Tenderness
  • Deformity or “bump” at the site of the fracture
  • Discoloration around the upper arm
  • Inability to normally move the arm without pain